Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Boating in Maine’

Our Lady Queen of Peace Catholic Church, Boothbay Harbor

Our Lady Queen of Peace Catholic Church, Boothbay Harbor

I’m WAY behind on the blogging – so although from this last entry it looks like our trip lasted a month (and that was our intention) -it’s over.  We cut the trip short when Bill started making his way up the coast.  So, our last port of call was sparkling Boothbay Harbor. We picked up a mooring for the first night (picture is from there) then moved to the dock in front of the Ebbtide Restaurant for two more nights.  Dock space is free there, with the assumption that you’ll eat your meals in the restaurant.  No problem!

After a couple of really hot days, spent like vampires – staying inside during the day, then venturing out at night, we decided it wasn’t worth it playing hide and seek with hurricanes for the next few weeks. We didn’t want to get stranded somewhere around the time we needed to fly to Florida to see Christopher and Emily (YIPPEE!!!) – so instead of continuing south, we headed back to Rockland. It was grand while it lasted and we’re grateful for every wonderful day we had.

The blog will shake itself off now, and get ready for a land trip to Nova Scotia in the Navion in a few days.  I’m already humming “On the Road Again”…

Read Full Post »

First time underway, with Feline Greenies for comfort

First time underway, with Feline Greenies for comfort

DSCN1096 I have been messing around with text for awhile and can’t seem to get it lined up with the appropriate pictures – so I’m just going to let the pictures tell the tale. With the introductory note that Taylor began the trip sitting in his bed in the pilot house instead of cowering in the head.  From that point on, he just got braver.  Well, given his extremely timid nature and shy disposition, he got braver…

DSCN1180

DSCN1176

DSCN1160

DSCN1165

DSCN1167

DSCN1175

Read Full Post »

 

Entrance to Burnt Coat Harbor

Entrance to Burnt Coat Harbor

It’s a more interesting harbor name than we’ve seen recently  (Northeast, Southwest, or the obvious family names) but we’ve forgotten the history to this one. It turns out there’s no burning of a coat involved. (Sad for me, I was imagining all kinds of exciting scenarios.)  Evidently the name is a translation/then anglicization of what Samuel de Champlain originally called a “burnt coast” when he visited here in 1603.  Presumably, a fire had swept through the forest of Swan’s Island, so I’m guessing  his initial view wasn’t as green as what we saw coming in today. 

It’s still a wonderful, unspoiled lobstering harbor, and looking out from ashore , on our walk, a lot more colorful than most.

Walking around Burnt Coat Harbor, Maine

Walking around Burnt Coat Harbor, Maine

DSCN1202

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View looking out to sea from Hockamock Light House on Swan's Island
View looking out to sea from Hockamock Light House on Swan’s Island

Read Full Post »

 

A view from the mooring in Lunt Harbor

A view from the mooring in Lunt Harbor

I find this place hard to describe.  Not geographically- the island’s about 8 miles out to sea off Mt. Desert Island, although it’s certainly worlds away from Bar Harbor.  It’s remote, simple and unspoiled, one of the dwindling number of islands in Maine with a year-round (about 70 people) population. It’s breathtakingly beautiful.  That part’s easy.  

What I can’t describe , or imagine (although it’s what I always think about when we’re here) – is what it must be like to call this island home.  Not for a  few days or months in the summer, but day in, day out,  year after year.  Generation after generation.  Dependent on the fickle sea for your livelihood, and while you’re out lobstering or fishing, your very life.  Dependent on a tiny community of people for everything you can’t supply for yourself.  From the skill or commodity you don’t have, to the love and friendship you need.   We come for a day or two, enjoy the hiking, the tiny museum at the head of the harbor, eat a lobster on the dock, watch the sun go down.  But then we go back to stores and services, movie theaters, libraries and restaurants. We’re transient.  We move and make new lives, new friends.  We don’t bury our departed loved ones on land next to our house.  We don’t take foster children into our homes in order to keep our school open. We don’t provide new homes to encourage newcomers to come live in our corner of the world, hoping they’ll stay and save our “island”.  Our fate isn’t so closely tied with that of our neighbors.

Or maybe it is.  We just don’t always see it as clearly.

Sunset in Lunt Harbor, Maine

Sunset in Lunt Harbor, Maine

 

 

Changing color from unchanged Lunt Harbor

Changing color from unchanged Lunt Harbor

Read Full Post »

 

Eggemoggin Reach Bridge

Eggemoggin Reach Bridge

Left the tranquility of little Bucks Harbor for a leisurely passage through Eggemoggin Reach.  I’m thinking about E.B. White (Stuart Little, Charlotte’s Web, and so much more) and his saltwater farm, not far from here.  We saw him on his doorstep there, while scouting his neck of the woods with Mom and Dad many years ago.  Also, this is the bridge where Christopher and I used to have to run to the bow and look up every time we passed underneath it.  (Of COURSE I did.)

DSCN1111Somes Sound, on Mount Desert Island,  is said to be the only true fjord in the eastern U.S.  (Hard-core geologists might insist it’s actually a fjard, the Scandinavian term for a small fjord – let them duke it out.)  It’s about 4 miles long and up to 150 feet deep and it’s where the last ice sheet sat some 14,000 years ago.  I read in one of our cruising guides that if you dropped New York City’s Chrysler Building into Somes Sound, you could stand on the building’s highest point and just see over the top of Norumba Mountain.  If you were on your tippy toes.  It’s not Norway or New Zealand, but the Norwegian in me is always  impressed.  Oofda!  The above picture is of the entrance to Somes Sound.  The following is a view off the bow from our mooring at Abels Boat Yard/Lobster Restaurant. Which has been run by the same family for many years (they told us how many, but we’ve already forgotten).  You can eat inside or outside on picnic tables.  We had our lobsters outside, watching the sun go down, ignoring, until the next day, whatever bit our ankles.

DSCN1116

Read Full Post »

After several days of cleaning, provisioning and moving our stuff aboard, we threw off our lines this morning and headed out for a month or so of living on the water.  The seas were calm, the sun was shining and Taylor not only didn’t throw up, he stayed in the pilot house instead of cowering in the shower.  Everything mechanical seemed to be humming along, so we waved  goodbye to Rockland and the hurly burly of the annual Lobster Festival.

Rockland Breakwater

Rockland Breakwater

 

 

 

 

We picked up a mooring in Bucks Harbor, a small, well-protected harbor on the Brooksville peninsula.  It’s the setting of the Caldecott-winning author, Robert McCloskey’s, children’s classics, “One Morning in Maine” and “Blueberries for Sal”. We miss having Chris with us to hike to the top of the hill, picking and eating off the blueberry bushes all the way.  Now, we’d want Emily there too.  We settle for buying a big carton of them at the Bucks Harbor Market.  They’re good, but not as fun as foraging.

We get out books, and decks of cards and start to decompress.  We decide to stay on the mooring for two nights.  Both nights we row to shore and head to a fine little restaurant, “Buck’s” in back of the market.  It’s filled both nights with lots of boaters – we’re the ones that come in with rain slickers, wild-looking hair and sunburns. (At least that describes me!)  It’s fun and very romantic, although the dinghy ride back to the boat in the dark and the cold is, oh, let’s say, exhilarating after a warm and cozy candlelit dinner.

Bucks Harbor Marine, Bucks Harbor Maine

Bucks Harbor Marine, Bucks Harbor Maine

 

 

 

 

Sunny afternoon in Bucks Harbor, Maine

Sunny afternoon in Bucks Harbor, Maine

 

 

 

Sailor Taylor, underway in the pilot house

Taylor, underway in the pilot house

 

 

 Taylor, realizing food comes out of the galley

Taylor, realizing food comes out of the galley

Read Full Post »