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Posts Tagged ‘Bayliner 45 Pilothouse’

Our Lady Queen of Peace Catholic Church, Boothbay Harbor

Our Lady Queen of Peace Catholic Church, Boothbay Harbor

I’m WAY behind on the blogging – so although from this last entry it looks like our trip lasted a month (and that was our intention) -it’s over.  We cut the trip short when Bill started making his way up the coast.  So, our last port of call was sparkling Boothbay Harbor. We picked up a mooring for the first night (picture is from there) then moved to the dock in front of the Ebbtide Restaurant for two more nights.  Dock space is free there, with the assumption that you’ll eat your meals in the restaurant.  No problem!

After a couple of really hot days, spent like vampires – staying inside during the day, then venturing out at night, we decided it wasn’t worth it playing hide and seek with hurricanes for the next few weeks. We didn’t want to get stranded somewhere around the time we needed to fly to Florida to see Christopher and Emily (YIPPEE!!!) – so instead of continuing south, we headed back to Rockland. It was grand while it lasted and we’re grateful for every wonderful day we had.

The blog will shake itself off now, and get ready for a land trip to Nova Scotia in the Navion in a few days.  I’m already humming “On the Road Again”…

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First time underway, with Feline Greenies for comfort

First time underway, with Feline Greenies for comfort

DSCN1096 I have been messing around with text for awhile and can’t seem to get it lined up with the appropriate pictures – so I’m just going to let the pictures tell the tale. With the introductory note that Taylor began the trip sitting in his bed in the pilot house instead of cowering in the head.  From that point on, he just got braver.  Well, given his extremely timid nature and shy disposition, he got braver…

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Entrance to Burnt Coat Harbor

Entrance to Burnt Coat Harbor

It’s a more interesting harbor name than we’ve seen recently  (Northeast, Southwest, or the obvious family names) but we’ve forgotten the history to this one. It turns out there’s no burning of a coat involved. (Sad for me, I was imagining all kinds of exciting scenarios.)  Evidently the name is a translation/then anglicization of what Samuel de Champlain originally called a “burnt coast” when he visited here in 1603.  Presumably, a fire had swept through the forest of Swan’s Island, so I’m guessing  his initial view wasn’t as green as what we saw coming in today. 

It’s still a wonderful, unspoiled lobstering harbor, and looking out from ashore , on our walk, a lot more colorful than most.

Walking around Burnt Coat Harbor, Maine

Walking around Burnt Coat Harbor, Maine

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View looking out to sea from Hockamock Light House on Swan's Island
View looking out to sea from Hockamock Light House on Swan’s Island

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A view from the mooring in Lunt Harbor

A view from the mooring in Lunt Harbor

I find this place hard to describe.  Not geographically- the island’s about 8 miles out to sea off Mt. Desert Island, although it’s certainly worlds away from Bar Harbor.  It’s remote, simple and unspoiled, one of the dwindling number of islands in Maine with a year-round (about 70 people) population. It’s breathtakingly beautiful.  That part’s easy.  

What I can’t describe , or imagine (although it’s what I always think about when we’re here) – is what it must be like to call this island home.  Not for a  few days or months in the summer, but day in, day out,  year after year.  Generation after generation.  Dependent on the fickle sea for your livelihood, and while you’re out lobstering or fishing, your very life.  Dependent on a tiny community of people for everything you can’t supply for yourself.  From the skill or commodity you don’t have, to the love and friendship you need.   We come for a day or two, enjoy the hiking, the tiny museum at the head of the harbor, eat a lobster on the dock, watch the sun go down.  But then we go back to stores and services, movie theaters, libraries and restaurants. We’re transient.  We move and make new lives, new friends.  We don’t bury our departed loved ones on land next to our house.  We don’t take foster children into our homes in order to keep our school open. We don’t provide new homes to encourage newcomers to come live in our corner of the world, hoping they’ll stay and save our “island”.  Our fate isn’t so closely tied with that of our neighbors.

Or maybe it is.  We just don’t always see it as clearly.

Sunset in Lunt Harbor, Maine

Sunset in Lunt Harbor, Maine

 

 

Changing color from unchanged Lunt Harbor

Changing color from unchanged Lunt Harbor

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On a mooring in Southwest Harbor

On a mooring in Southwest Harbor

 

 

 

For almost thirty years we’ve been cruising up the coast to NORTHEAST Harbor.  Sometimes we detour up Somes Sound (again, on this trip). On other occasions  (like wanting to see fireworks on Christopher’s 4th of July birthday) we’ve picked up a mooring or pier space in Bar Harbor.  In a big storm, in a smaller boat, we’ve taken shelter further north.  But, we’ve never ventured into Southwest Harbor.  Right at the entrance to Somes Sound, on the way to Northeast, we pass by it all the time.  Another example of too soon old/ too late smart. But now we have an updated waterway guidebook that points us in the right direction.  We call Hinckley’s for a mooring and head on in.

Looking out to sea from a mooring in Southwest Harbor, Maine

Looking out to sea from a mooring in Southwest Harbor, Maine

 

 


 

 

We set our record for the most moorings picked up in one day. (Almost for a season.)  Picked up and tied onto four different moorings in various parts of the harbor before settling on #3 (4th one to be picked up). We were rocking and rolling so much on the first three, that leaving Taylor, pitching about on his own on one of those, as we went ashore for our own selfish pleasures, just wasn’t an option.  (For his fans, he’s going to have an entire blog entry on his bravery and seaworthiness, coming soon…)

We love Southwest Harbor.  It has something for everyone.  For mariners, there’s both a West Marine AND a Hamilton Marine. Does that boater smorgasbord exist anywhere else along the seacoast in Maine?!  And, they have unbelievably scenic locations.  (I’m picturing our marine store in Madison, WI, in a strip mall.)  

We have lunch at “The Quiet Side Cafe” on Maine Street – and the food is so delicious, and it is such a memorable, small, family-run place, that we go back three days in a row. (If you go there, don’t miss the fish chowder – it has so much fish in it, you’ll be looking for the potatoes.  And the crab rolls…maybe best ever.)  And once you’re there, you know why it’s a place you want to patronize, over and over again.  Even if you have to wait a bit…

We take the LL Bean free bus for an hour ride, out to Bass Harbor and beyond, we walk the town and a little bit beyond, and on our last night there, we dingy in for a cabaret dinner show at the upper deck restaurant at the head of the harbor.  (In all honesty, I should say that the food was sub-par, but the youthful enthusiasm and talent of the performing staff made it more than worthwhile.)

And the nights were beautiful!

 

Southwest Harbor, Maine

Southwest Harbor, Maine

 

Goodnight Southwest Harbor, Maine

Goodnight Southwest Harbor, Maine

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Northeast Harbor, Maine

Northeast Harbor, Maine

 

And once we get onto this mooring, we just don’t let go.  What we think is going to be a 2-3 night stay turns into 6.  We take it day by day, hailing the mooring agent when they make their rounds on the water each morning.  Another night please…

 

 

It’s not fog or high seas keeping us in the harbor this time – so what are we doing?Really, not much.  We dinghy into the public pier and take the scenic, free (L.L.Bean sponsored) bus into Bar Harbor, take the walk along the ocean there, peruse the bookstore, buy some groceries.  We take walks in Northeast Harbor, crossing over to Somes Sound and look at it from land.  We come in almost every morning and walk to the Kimball Terrace Inn for breakfast, overlooking the harbor.  We go to the tiny Farmer’s Market after breakfast one day, and shop alongside Martha Stewart.  Another day we stop in the shade of a tree and talk to Chris and Emily about how their new home in Florida is coming along.  We read a lot. We take the free bus to Bar Harbor again with a list of things we forgot to bring, or think we now need.  I get a cheap hat so I don’t get so sunburned.  We get some more groceries and postcards.  We watch sunsets.

 

Another night in Northeast Harbor, Maine

Another night in Northeast Harbor, Maine

 

 

 

 

 

 

We watch the fog roll in. We listen to the lobster boats leaving early in the morning, and watch them unload in the afternoon.  We think about how lucky we are.  And we stay another day.

 

On a mooring in Northeast Harbor, Maine

On a mooring in Northeast Harbor, Maine

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